Library Advocates

ALA Washington Office

The American Library Association's Washington Office tumblr. We post about federal policies that affect libraries, including copyright, privacy and access. We also post about ebooks and, admittedly, the occasional library fluff.

Library Advocates

May 8
Final drawing for Where the Wild Things Are. Pen and ink, watercolor.© Maurice Sendak, 1963, 1991, all rights reserved. Courtesy, Rosenbach Museum & Library
Maurice Sendak, illustrator and author of nearly 100 books and winner of ALA’s 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where The Wild Things Are, died May 8. He was 83. Creator of amazing nightmares, as the New York Times called Sendak, the artist’s works live on at the Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia, where he contributed more than 10,000 of his illustrations and manuscripts since 1966, and was a trustee. He gained the title of honorary president in 2003.
From Pen to Publisher, an exhibit featuring three of his works, The Sign on Rosie’s Door (1960), Outside Over There (1981), and Brundibar (2003), currently on display at the museum, will be taken down in the near future for a legacy exhibt. The Sendak Gallery is free of charge today in his memory.
The Rosenbach Museum and Library, open to the public since 1954 and the former townhome of two Rosenbach brothers, houses works that reflect their life’s passions: rare books and fine art. A. S. W. Rosenbach gained fame as the developer of Harvard University’s Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library. He was hired to build the collection by the mother of Widener, a wealthy young bibliophile who sank with the Titanic in 1912.
Read the full post on American Libraries Magazine.

Final drawing for Where the Wild Things Are. Pen and ink, watercolor.© Maurice Sendak, 1963, 1991, all rights reserved. Courtesy, Rosenbach Museum & Library

Maurice Sendak, illustrator and author of nearly 100 books and winner of ALA’s 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where The Wild Things Are, died May 8. He was 83. Creator of amazing nightmares, as the New York Times called Sendak, the artist’s works live on at the Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia, where he contributed more than 10,000 of his illustrations and manuscripts since 1966, and was a trustee. He gained the title of honorary president in 2003.

From Pen to Publisher, an exhibit featuring three of his works, The Sign on Rosie’s Door (1960), Outside Over There (1981), and Brundibar (2003), currently on display at the museum, will be taken down in the near future for a legacy exhibt. The Sendak Gallery is free of charge today in his memory.

The Rosenbach Museum and Library, open to the public since 1954 and the former townhome of two Rosenbach brothers, houses works that reflect their life’s passions: rare books and fine art. A. S. W. Rosenbach gained fame as the developer of Harvard University’s Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library. He was hired to build the collection by the mother of Widener, a wealthy young bibliophile who sank with the Titanic in 1912.

Read the full post on American Libraries Magazine.


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