Library Advocates

ALA Washington Office

The American Library Association's Washington Office tumblr. We post about federal policies that affect libraries, including copyright, privacy and access. We also post about ebooks and, admittedly, the occasional library fluff.

Library Advocates

Posts tagged libraries

Oct 14

Oct 11

Oct 10
Did you read "Progress in the Making: An Introduction to 3D Printing and Public Policy"? Download our tip sheet, which provides an overview of 3D printing, describes a number of ways libraries are currently using 3D printers and outlines the legal implications of providing the technology.(Photo via flickr.)

Did you read "Progress in the Making: An Introduction to 3D Printing and Public Policy"? Download our tip sheet, which provides an overview of 3D printing, describes a number of ways libraries are currently using 3D printers and outlines the legal implications of providing the technology.(Photo via flickr.)


Oct 9
The American Library Association urged the Department of Education in a letter (pdf) Wednesday to include public libraries as early learning partners in the Proposed Requirements for School Improvement Grants.

The American Library Association urged the Department of Education in a letter (pdf) Wednesday to include public libraries as early learning partners in the Proposed Requirements for School Improvement Grants.


Oct 8

Making the Election Connection from ALA Washington on Vimeo.

On Monday, October 6, 2014, the American Library Association (ALA) and Advocacy Guru Stephanie Vance collaborated to host “Making the Election Connection,” an interactive webinar that explored the ways that library advocates can legally engage during an election season, as well as what types of activities have the most impact. Library supporters who missed Tuesday’s advocacy webinar now have access to the archived video.


booksthatmatter:

The best way to spend a vacation.

booksthatmatter:

The best way to spend a vacation.


Oct 7
todaysdocument:

This month is our 2nd Tumblrversary and we now stand at over 99,500 followers and climbing!   
Two years ago we started the Today’s Document Tumblr as a somewhat dubious social media experiment and never would have believed that today we’d be on the cusp of 100,000 followers.  We love bringing you a little sliver of history every day, and are gratified that you all keep coming back for more.  So here’s to all our fans, followers, rebloggers, history nerds, fellow tumblarians, and to our National Archives colleagues who have made all these great records available for us to share!  Thanks!! 
 
(And just in case this wasn’t apparent, no, there is no “U.S. Social Media Commission” we’re aware of - but check out the GSA’s USA.gov Tumblr - they’re probably the closest thing to it.)

todaysdocument:

This month is our 2nd Tumblrversary and we now stand at over 99,500 followers and climbing!   

Two years ago we started the Today’s Document Tumblr as a somewhat dubious social media experiment and never would have believed that today we’d be on the cusp of 100,000 followers.  We love bringing you a little sliver of history every day, and are gratified that you all keep coming back for more.  So here’s to all our fans, followers, rebloggers, history nerds, fellow tumblarians, and to our National Archives colleagues who have made all these great records available for us to share!  Thanks!! 

 

(And just in case this wasn’t apparent, no, there is no “U.S. Social Media Commission” we’re aware of - but check out the GSA’s USA.gov Tumblr - they’re probably the closest thing to it.)


Oct 3

In September 2003, Attorney General John Ashcroft called out the librarians. The American Library Association and civil liberties groups, he said, were pushing “baseless hysteria” about the controversial Patriot Act. He suggested that they were worried that spy agencies wanted to know “how far you have gotten on the latest Tom Clancy novel.”

In the case of government surveillance, they are not shushing. They’ve been among the loudest voices urging freedom of information and privacy protections.

–Librarians won’t stay quiet about government surveillance, The Washington Post

In September 2003, Attorney General John Ashcroft called out the librarians. The American Library Association and civil liberties groups, he said, were pushing “baseless hysteria” about the controversial Patriot Act. He suggested that they were worried that spy agencies wanted to know “how far you have gotten on the latest Tom Clancy novel.”

In the case of government surveillance, they are not shushing. They’ve been among the loudest voices urging freedom of information and privacy protections.

Librarians won’t stay quiet about government surveillance, The Washington Post


Oct 1

Sep 30

ensnaring-birdcages:

Finally got my ALA membership. And have plans to go to Midwinter in January. Woo!

image

Woohoo! See you there!